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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
holbrooke. i asked her why now is the time to write her memoir. >> i wanted to make something permanent out of what turned out to be impermanent, that is my 17 years with richard, my husband who died entirely unexpectedly in the middle of life. and in the days after his death, i couldn't sleep, so i started keeping a journal. and that really was the genesis of this book. and then it kind of took own a life of its own. but i don't think it's worth writing a memoir without being honest. >> you were married to peter jennings and news correspondent and now an author. >> this is by no mean as tell-all book. it's very honest, as honest as i could make it. there tees nothing in there that isn't honest but i chose themes that i thought would be universal. human themes. okay, it's my life, my story, but, in fact, it's really about the human condition. and although it was triggered by the great trauma that followed my beloved husband's sudden death, it's really not at all about grief. it's really about how to get from grief to a different place because sadly grief is as much a part of the human condi
we all remember the day that your husband, ambassador to the united nations richard holbrooke died unexpect unexpectedly. you write about that day and the memorial. why don't you share with us. >> that was a day that started as all of my days for 17 years. started with a phone call from richard who, as you know, was always in a troubled spot. islamabad, kabul. on this day he was actually en route to the white house. we were making our christmas plans and laughing and joking on the phone and all was well, and an hour later i had a call if there the ambulance that was taking him to the emergency room and that was our last conversation. and then being the wife of such a public man, my morning cou ii mourning could not stay private and i understand that. and i had to plan a memorial that was worthy of such a public man, and that imposed its own stresses. but at the same time, it was a balm, reassuring to me to have discovered that richard had touched so many lives around the world and letters kept pouring in and i red each one. but in reading those letters, decided that i really couldn
of the greatest diplomats of his generation pass away not long ago, richard holbrooke, and i think everyone who knew him or sat across from the table from him would agree he was not by anyone's traditional definition particularly diplomatic. >> no. but he was also a brilliant negotiator. >> they come in all types and sizes and approaches. >> has the president seen "the devil wears prada"? [laughter] megyn: john bolton, former ambassador to the united nations. it's come to this! has the president seen "the devil wears prada,", which, you know, was profittedly based on anna wintour. your thoughts on that, mr. ambassador. >> how do you know she's not going to be the next secretary of state? why limit her to a mere ambassadorship? it wouldn't surprise me. it has been historically the case that large contributors to presidential campaigns get appointed -- megyn: and she's one of the top ten bundlers for president obama. >> and i have to tell you, i've had wide experience with political appointees -- true, mostly republicans -- and they've been very effective. i would not underestimate how important
, you know, the sense that we are a country that on foreign power, survives, and richard drops in every couple weeks, every couple months to see how we're doing. we allow him that, and that's because of great shame, and, you know, mr. holbrooke, who i count as one of my many cosmic enemies -- [laughter] >> really? >> many. david miliband is another. i'm biting my nails over sanity, but so, came into pakistan to push for the lugar bill to give $7 billion to pakistan over five years for development aide, and the conditions are completely repugnant, and we have to open up everything to receive this money, and richard holbrooke came in and said those against the lugar bill are against democracy in pakistan. that's rich. >> yes, down in front. microphone, two seconds to get to you. >> thank you for your presentation. fascinating. this is a little bit off the subject, but i wonder if you followed the case and if you're aware that she was sentenced yesterday here in new york to 876 years. -- 86 years in prison. >> yes. >> comment on why she's become a national icon in pakistan. >> i think she'
diplomat, he took the post after ambassador richard holbrooke's sudden death, two years ago today. marc grossman, who is leaving his post this week, joins me to talk about his time as envoy and the challenges that lie ahead. thank you for coming in. >> thank you for having me. >>. >> warner: so you are one of the few u.s. officials who have ever met with representatives of the taliban. your first meeting was someone who was described as a former aide to mullah omar in october of 2011 what was it like? what was he like? >> well, first of all, thank you very much for having me. you know, it was abexperience that both very productive and very difficult. one of the challenges that secretary clinton gave me when we took this job was to see if i coulden find and then have this conversation with the taliban. and what she said in a very important speech was you don't make peace with your friends, you make peace with your enemies. and what i did, margaret, in order to get ready for that first encounter was i read a lot by people who had been in similar situations in northern ireland, in have sri
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)